Monthly Archives: December 2016

Almost Half of Music Listening

In May 2016, Edison Research studied more than 8,500 US consumers ages 13 and older and how much time they spent listening to music. Almost half (or 44%) of all time spent listening to music was spent on the AM/FM radio format, followed by listening to music participants had purchased (including CDs and digital music files) at 18%. Streaming accounted for 17% of music listening time. Devicewise, AM/FM radio came on top again. More than 40% of music listening time was spent with traditional radio receivers. Meanwhile, 23% was spent with mobile devices and 16% with desktop and laptop PCs.

Despite the evidence that radio continues to have a hold on the largest share of the music-listening market, subscriptions to streaming music sites are growing globally. In separate April research from International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, an estimated 68 million people were music service subscribers in 2015, compared to 41 million the year prior.

Simultanous media use while watching TV is nothing new. Many internet users surf the web or conduct other activities while watching TV. In fact, the number of people multitasking while watching TV continues to rise, while cord-cutting also accelerates, according to eMarketer.

Another 30% pointed to event spaces as places they would want to experience VR technology. Nearly as many said they wantd to use VR while watching sports outside the home. Many consumers in Japan are skeptical of VR. But there’s a certain level of excitement, as well: 40% were excited about purchasing the PlayStation VR. But perhaps the main obstruction to VR technology is a simple ignorance around it: Over 40% of men ages 50 to 69 don’t even know what VR technology is, and over 50% of women the same age reported the same in May 2016, according to a Mobile JustSystems survey.

Launch new services

Radio-style services are amping up their streaming offerings to give users control over what they listen to; at the same time, streaming services are pushing to provide more programmed experiences for users, who don’t always want to create their own playlists.

With its new Premium option, which will carry the now-standard price tag of $10 a month, Pandora touts on-demand, ad free streaming and the ability to save songs and albums offline, similar to other all-you-can-eat streaming services. What sets Pandora Premium apart is its ability to suggest personalized songs for playlists, music searches and browsing based on individual listening history.

Pandora is the clear leader among all digital radio services. According to September 2016 data from comScore Mobile Metrix, Pandora is the ninth most popular smartphone app among US adult smartphone users, with a reach of 40.5% of US smartphone users. Apple Music is the only other music streaming app in the top 15, with a reach of 34.2%.

Users are already spending a significant amount of time listening to Pandora, even before its launch of Premium. eMarketer estimates that, on average, US adults spend more than 11 minutes per day listening to Pandora, which works out to more than 3% of all digital time. The average includes adults who don’t use Pandora; among Pandora users, time spent listening to the service totals 46 minutes a day.

The announcement of Pandora Premium follows its September 2016 launch of Pandora Plus, an updated version of its Pandora One offering, which costs users $5 per month. Plus users are able to listen to Pandora’s radio service ad-free at higher quality streams, with unlimited skips and replays, and includes an offline-listening option.

Pandora Premium’s unveiling came on the heels of iHeartRadio’s announcement of two new services, iHeartRadio Plus and iHeartRadio All Access. Like Pandora Plus, iHeartRadio Plus will let users search, save, replay and skip songs while listening to a live digital radio stream for $4.99 per month.

 

US Social Media Big Users

Indeed, social media users were more than three times as likely to conduct TV-related actions on Facebook than they were on Twitter, including commenting, posting, sharing or voting in response to content they saw on TV. And they were nearly four times as likely to do so on Facebook than on Instagram, the study from Ring Digital, a marketing and product strategy firm for the TV and video industry, found.

That’s not really that surprising given that Facebook’s user base is so huge. This year, there will be 143.5 million US Facebook users, according to eMarketer. To compare, Twitter has 52.2 million users, Instagram has 67.2 million, Snapchat has 58.6 million and Tumblr has 23.2 million. YouTube does have more US users than Facebook does—180.1 million—but YouTube activity is not really centered around communication like status updates or discussions.

Simultanous media use while watching TV is nothing new. Many internet users surf the web or conduct other activities while watching TV. In fact, the number of people multitasking while watching TV continues to rise, while cord-cutting also accelerates, according to eMarketer.

Separate research from TiVo also found that most digital viewers multitask while watching TV. More than half of respondents said live television was the TV or video format during which they most likely multitasked.

Know The Most Internet Users in Japan

Of the 34.3% of respondents who said they would prefer to experience VR technology somewhere other than their own living rooms, nearly a third listed movie theaters as a location where they would be interested in using VR technology.

Another 30% pointed to event spaces as places they would want to experience VR technology. Nearly as many said they wantd to use VR while watching sports outside the home.

Many consumers in Japan are skeptical of VR. But there’s a certain level of excitement, as well: 40% were excited about purchasing the PlayStation VR.

But perhaps the main obstruction to VR technology is a simple ignorance around it: Over 40% of men ages 50 to 69 don’t even know what VR technology is, and over 50% of women the same age reported the same in May 2016, according to a Mobile JustSystems survey.

Men were more likely to be interested than women, though it’s worth noting that more men ages 15 to 19 knew what a VR system was and weren’t interested than any age range younger than 60 (though that simply may be because they more often knew what VR was).