Monthly Archives: November 2016

Finding a Balance with Ads

More than a third of mobile game professionals surveyed by game analytics company deltaDNA said their primary concern when setting ad frequency within free-to-play games was about depressing player engagement levels.

More than a quarter of respondents said they were primarily concerned about lower levels of player enjoyment, and 14% of mobile game professionals worry most about churn—that they’ll be cycling players in and out as they grow frustrated, rather than growing their user base.

Mobile game professionals weren’t just worried about player interaction. For example, 6% said they were concerned about potential loss of in-app purchase revenues, and nearly as many were concerned about a drop in ad fill rate.

Though advertising within mobile games can be intrusive to users, that’s not to say that all players dislike seeing it. Much of the advertising within mobile games is rewards-based, and research from Unity Technologies found that nearly half of US mobile gamers who play at least monthly prefer viewing rewarded video ads in free-to-play games.

Moreover, some 29% of respondents said they preferred full-screen picture ads to support their free gaming habit.

Worldwide, and aside from the VR professionals themselves, it’s also encouraging that investment in VR and AR companies has been on the rise. According to CB Insights, a venture capital research firm, since early 2014, more than $2.5 billion has been invested in VR and AR companies across more than 200 deals.

AR Workers Confident in Profitability

From Facebook’s Oculus Rift to Snapchat Lenses, the immersive media space has certainly become a headline grabber. But the big question is: How profitable could virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) activities be in the near future? According to July 2016 research, fewer than half of VR professionals in the Americas anticipate gains from this work over the next 12 months.

In July, Greenlight Insights (formerly Greenlight VR) and Road to VR surveyed 514 VR professionals in the US, Canada and Mexico about their expectations on profitability of both VR and AR activities.

According to the data, 45.2% of respondents felt that their VR and AR activities will be cost-effective to their organization in the next 12 months. In contrast, 22.4% said they do not anticipate being profitable in that timefrome.

Of those that are expecting profits, 35.7% of VR professionals anticipate hitting VR- and AR-related revenues of $250K or less, according to the same study. But even more promising, another 38.4% are forecasting between $250K to $5 million-plus in revenues.

 

Multitasking While Watching TV

Research from Ericsson, a communications technology company specializing in mobility, broadband and the cloud surveyed more than 30,000 internet users worldwide ages 16 to 69 who have a broadband internet connection at home and watch TV and view video on a weekly basis. Generally, the study found that more respondents are conducting digital activities via a smartphone or tablet, while at the same time watching TV, than they did in 2014.

For example, two years ago, less than a quarter of TV and video viewers said they browse the internet, related to the content they were currently watching. Fast forward to 2016, and nearly a third of respondents said they were doing so.

Similarly, in 2014, 15% of respondents said they watched two or more programs at the same time. This year, 20% said they did.

Separate data from eMarketer also finds that Americans’ attention is increasingly divided among an ever-expanding array of internet-connected devices, and the number of people multitasking while watching TV continues to rise.

A survey from TiVo also indicates that digital viewers multitask while watching TV. More than half of respondents said live television was the TV or video format during which they most likely multitasked.